Misc Monday ~ in which there are not enough spoons

Many of you are probably already aware of the Spoon Theory. (Those of you who are not should read up on it. It’s a great way to describe energy rationing for those with chronic illness or disabilities. Even if this doesn’t impact you at all, it probably impacts one or more of your close friends or family members, whether or not you know it.)

Now, usually I have plenty of spoons. However, I do have occasional depressive tendencies. (I think many of us do, whether or not we acknowledge them.) I do not mean “ooh, you get sad a lot” when I refer to depression. I am referring to the more physical version, which comes with fatigue and a complete lack of energy or motivation to do anything. And I don’t mean that I don’t want to do my chores. When I get depressed, I don’t want to do anything. And I don’t have the energy for much, either. There are days when the only reason I get out of bed is because I have to go to work. (I don’t have bad enough episodes to prevent me from going to work on my worst days. I have it comparatively good, and I recognize that. But I have also learned not to belittle my issues just because “someone else has it worse”.)

Anyway, like I said, usually I have plenty of spoons. But last week, I had barely enough spoons for the entire early part of the week. I managed to do what I had to, and only what I had to. Once that was done, I collapsed on the couch, staring at the TV and not even really doing any crafting because even knitting or crocheting took too much energy.

This is something I am both used to and not. I am used to it enough that I know there are days when I am not going to get anything done and have come to accept that there’s no use beating myself up over it; that will only make things worse because guilt feeds my depression and makes it last longer. Sleep is one of the things that helps, but it seems I have to force myself to get sleep because getting ready for bed takes too much effort.

So… all of this is to explain why this blog post is delayed, and being posted in the afternoon instead of the morning. Once my spoons were replenished toward the end of last week, I didn’t have time to catch up on everything and scheduling blog posts was one of the easy things to set aside.

But, I am also writing this post as a reminder. Sometimes people who seem perfectly fine aren’t. And sometimes they need extra understanding or extra help even when there’s no visible reason why they should. If you have enough spoons, and you see someone who is running low, please consider doing something to help them out. Even a small thing for you could be huge for them.

Misc Monday ~ in which I become one of the 3%

I did something this weekend which I have been wanting to do for a while: I donated blood.

No big deal, right? Yay me. But, it got me thinking. (Part of the reason for the thinking was some of the paperwork & promotional material they had on hand at the donation site.) Why had I not donated before? I’ve been eligible (off & on) since I was old enough, and this is the first time I donated.

Well, I guess it’s the same reasons a lot of eligible people don’t donate. Too busy, too much of a hassle to go somewhere to do it, and – the big one for most people – NEEDLES. Ick. Giving blood for lab work is bad enough; you want me to voluntarily get a needle stuck in me?

And yet, I don’t really feel that way about needles. Shots are no big deal. Blood work (now) isn’t much worse. Just don’t make me watch the needle going in, and I’m fine. (When I was a kid the story was different and involved a tech trying and failing to find my vein multiple times, but that was then and this is now.)

Anyway, I finally got there, thanks in no small part to my dad booking the appointment for me. I’d been wanting to go donate, but he made the extra push that got me off my butt to actually do it.

And while I was there, I found out that only 37% of the American public is eligible to donate. Between permanent disqualifications (diseases, lifestyle, medications), temporary ones (shorter term illnesses, international travel, vaccines), and age restrictions, that leaves only 37% of the population who can donate. And of that percentage, only 5% do donate. In my specific area? Make it 3%. Yes. You read that right. Only 3% of people in my area donate blood.

And I hadn’t been… why again? Because it was too much of a bother.

Yeah. That’s gonna change.

With the current political climate, I’ve been trying to come up with things I can do to make a change for the better. This is one of them.

Misc Monday ~ in which we muse about social media

I wasn’t quite sure where to start for this first official Misc Monday, but then I remembered that a friend of mine commented on the introductory one that I should talk about virtual friends and how they’re real friends. And it’s true: I’m sure that all (or at least most) of you have friends you met online who you still consider real friends. You may have never met these people IRL, and so do they still count? I think so. I am in contact more with online friends I have never met in person than just about everyone I went to school with. I won’t even pretend to claim that online friends aren’t real friends.

But then that got me thinking – how do we meet new online friends these days? Twitter, perhaps. Blogs, definitely. Most of the people I know don’t meet new people on Facebook, since they have their privacy settings locked down relatively tightly there. But Instagram? Snapchat? Other new social media options that the kids are using to get away from the formerly-cool sites which their parents now use?

I remember some of the older ones. MySpace is an obvious choice. But did any of you use Plurk? (I know at least one of you did, since that’s where I met the person who suggested this topic.) And how many of you went to school in the era of IRC chatrooms? I met a boyfriend there back in the day. (Yes, we met in person. No, it didn’t end well. And that’s all I’m going to say about it.)

It really makes you think. I had school-sponsored pen-pals in elementary school. Do they still do that anymore? Or if they do, are they online instead of pen and paper? And if that has changed, is it a good thing, or bad? (My answer: change is often a good thing, so it’s probably good. Unless the change is that they no longer do it – it was an amazing experience to communicate with someone in a completely different situation than me, and kids these days need to experience that at least as much as I did.)

Anyway. That’s my initial take on the subject. I may think of more to say on the matter later. What are your thoughts?

Misc Monday ~ in which we try something new

So, for a while now I’ve been wanting to do another regular blog post. I have WIP Weds, Friday Reads, and there used to be Ten on Tuesday, but that prompt eventually stopped after a nice long run. But what new blog topic did I want to do? I don’t have enough consistent and shareable writing progress for that to make a good regular blog topic, and I couldn’t think of any other regular blog feature I wanted to add.

However, in the past when I’ve wanted to blog about something but haven’t had a specific topic, I’ve just rambled on about something random. I could make that a regular feature, couldn’t I?

So today I’m introducing Misc Mondays, where I will post on (most) Mondays about whatever I feel like. It might be current events. It might be something I’ve been working on which doesn’t really fit in the craft theme of WIP Weds. It might be a review of a book that I particularly liked (or disliked). It might be a list of random things that are on my mind strung together with or without an obvious theme.

Today it is this introduction. But next week? Who knows?