FO: Dreambird shawl

This really is the year of the WIP! I’ve been finishing things like crazy. (Or at least it feels like crazy. Maybe it’s really that I’m normally very slow to finish projects and this year I’m average. Or maybe I always knit and finish objects at this speed, but this year I’m tracking them and so I’m more aware of it.) I guess I should probably have called it the Year Of The FO, since the goal has been to finish projects. But oh well. The year’s more than half over now (eep!) so I’m not going to be changing names now.

At any rate, there are two more FOs to show you. Yay! We’ll do them one at a time, though, in order to properly appreciate each one.

Today’s FO is the Dreambird Shawl.
20140707-002507-1507895.jpg
I love the shawl. That is all.

And really, why wouldn’t you?

The colors are incredible. The pattern is beautiful. The yarn is soft. I love this shawl.

Of course, I did find some things that I would do differently if I were to knit it again. And while the pattern is lovely, it’s not what I would call a beginner’s pattern. It could be, but it’s not written as concisely as I would hope from a beginner’s pattern. I read through the instructions before casting on, and wondered if my knitting skills were up to the challenge, and I’m NOT a novice knitter. I ended up using the cheat sheet (with some of my notes scribbled on it) as if it was the pattern, and that was much simpler. I think the designer, in trying to make the pattern easier to understand, made it more difficult than it needed to be.
20140707-002835-1715469.jpg
So I guess what I’m saying boils down to this: if you plan to knit Dreambird, give yourself time to sort through the pattern first. Read everything, then make your own notes on the cheat sheet, and work from that.

20140707-002702-1622439.jpgOne of my mods was carrying the yarns along the back when not in use. You can barely tell.

But don’t let the pattern scare you away. The result is so worth it.

One modification that I would do if I were to knit it again is to not create the spines in the feathers. Since the purl stitches are on different rows, there’s a jog between them. And I don’t like the way that jog looks. I’ve seen someone else’s modification where they kept all of the inside edge stitches live, and then at the end they cast them all off with an i-cord bind off. That looked cool, and I might do that on a future version. (That’s a lot of stitches to keep live, though. And you have to plan ahead with yarn amounts.)

Anyway. I am super thrilled with how this turned out, and I can’t wait to wear it.
20140707-002448-1488203.jpg
SPECS: (and a link to my Rav project page)

PATTERN: Dreambird KAL
DESIGNER: Nadita Swings
YARN: Chroma Fingering in Lollipop and Essential Tweed in Flint Tweed (both by Knit Picks)
NEEDLES: US 3
START/END DATES: October 13, 2013 – June 25, 2014
MODS: (1) I left one background stitch left unworked at the tip of each feather to carry the background yarn all the way around as an outline. I liked the way it looked better. (2) I carried the yarn up the back instead of breaking the yarn each time I changed colors. This meant I needed to weave the old color through 5 stitches when I started knitting with the new yarn, and in the case of the Chroma I also needed to float it up the back of the piece once. But it’s not any more noticeable than the woven-in ends are, and it’s so much easier.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “FO: Dreambird shawl

  1. salpal1 says:

    WOW – that is lovely!

  2. Chris says:

    That is absolutely stunning!

  3. Love how this turned out. Beautiful.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s